collapse

* Navigation

* User Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

* Who's Online

  • Dot Guests: 23
  • Dot Hidden: 0
  • Dot Users: 4
  • Dot Users Online:

* Calendar

December 2018
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31

Author Topic: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions  (Read 2749 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Sakuya

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • MIB Signature Jackson
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Gender: Female
  • Artist for hire!
    • View Profile
    • Sakuya's DA
Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« on: December 02, 2017, 10:43:53 AM »
Alright, christmas is 22 days away and I finally got to watch Olof's frozen adventure, and despite the bad reviews, I found it quite nice. Sure, it don't bring much new stuff to the stage, I dont think it was meant to do that, moreso i think it was just supposed to be a heart warming christmas movie that were supposed to showcase some traditions. The problem with it is that its quite a long episode and people went to the movies to see Coco more than Frozen... Well that a side, lets look at the traditions seen in the short movie and talk about their origins! As a swedish person I will try my best to tell you about the traditions shown that come from scandinavia, however I am not familiar with all traditions so forgive me if I cant tell you much about the hanukka traditions (my jewish knowledge is a bit lacking).
Ok let's begin!


Barely 1 minute into the movie and we already got a lot of stuff showing! The xmas tree in the back is very familiar to us all. They originally came from germany and spread very well to other countries. Originally they used to be decorated with candy, sweets and apples.

On the tables you can see cheeses, breads and ham. Yes, traditionally we eat ham in scandinavia on christmas eve (and yes we celebrate christmas eve and not christmas day). Another popular item on the christmas table is the ribs. In some regions they like to eat eel instead, but that is diminishing because the eels have been fished a bit too hard so they gotta hold back on fishing it.
The bread on the table is too generic to be properly identified and there are a lot of different type of christmas breads... One of my own personal favorite breads for the holiday is Farine bread... its not exactly a holiday bread but my family always bake it in the winter for christmas. 

The pile of breads that look like a christmas tree is a Kransekaka that is found in Norway and Denmark, but its not something common on the swedish tables... Behind it is what I believe is a smörgås cake, it is a bit hard to identify it to be honest... Normally they dont really look like that, but it do look like there is shrimp put on it so it might be. Smörgås cake is something that is very common in sweden, almost any kind of celebration have them. They are basically a cake made of sandwiches, lettuce, shrimp and other sandwich stuff.

If you look to the bottom right corner you will see small piggies. Those are Marzipan pigs, a popular christmas treat. They are shaped like pigs due to our tradition of eating ham on Christmas Eve as I mentioned earlier.
On a slightly later shot you can see a pie and two cakes... It looks like a chocolate cake and a strawberry cream cake. They are rather common cakes, specially the Strawberry cake, swedes love strawberries. I cant tell you how common it would be to find a cake like that on xmas though... In my family we eat a cake because christmas eve is my birthday and I have never been to anyone elses celebration...
In another later shot we get Anna putting powder sugar on a gingerbread castle. While most people dont do castles, ginger bread houses are extremely common. Gingerbread is THE christmas cookie, wherever you will go you will find gingerbread cookies!


Ok here we see the Yule goat, imagery that is everywhere in the short. It is a very common symbol in the Scandinavian countries as goats have been important farm animals since before the viking ages. The goats were important enough to be the ride of Thor the thunder god and they stayed important even after Christianity turned the vikings mid winter celebrations into christmas. You will often find small goats made of hay and in the city of Gävle they put up a huuuge goat in the city square.
Funny thing to note, is that on the bell are runes that say: Ring in the season.

Then the people at the court ground mentions some traditions. "Rolling the lefsa" is what I think I heard someone of them say and I honestly dont know what that means... Either the english butchered the pronunciation or its something from one of the other holidays near xmas...Next one said they were going to put out porridge for Tomten and this is going to take some explanations...

You see, Tomten is a small little man with often huge beards,they fall into the gnome category. The often look like small version of Santa clause but in more drab clothing. They were said to be hard working little guys whom helped looking after homes and farms and you had to make sure that you didnt anger him or he would let bad luck befall the farm. Putting out porridge was a way to appease the gnome, but you still had to be careful so you didnt give him too good stuff or he would end up thinking he was too good for the farm and would leave it.
Next were a pair of twins and I have no idea what they are actually saying...Stobbelbockels? No clue..

Kristoffs troll traditions are as far as I can tell, mostly made up... While in my childhood we did make a stone troll and named him Waldemar, that was not a christmas tradition... His stew might be a veeeery loose reference to dip in the pot... Basically its a soup stew thingy where you dip a slice of bread into it to eat it all soggy... It might not be connected at all but atleast you know of Dip in the pot now!


Ok this one might seem obvious, but I actually have some special travia about candy canes. While the origin of the peppermint candy canes come from germany, there is a city in Sweden that is renown for its pepperming candy! Gränna has some of the best candycanes and you can get to watch while they make them when you visit the shops! I once visited and while the city is very small, it was amazing to visit.


I have no clue if this is based on a real tradition...



Ok these are not scandinavian tradition. Caroling and hanging socks are very much brittish traditions. Hanging socks have slipped in in current times as a fun thing for kids due to american and british media. While Americans and Brittanians have to wait till christmas day morning to open their christmas gifts, in scandinavia we boldly meet the Santa to receive our presents!


And this is clearly a Jewish family with a dreidel toy and a Menorah. I believe it is better for one of our jewish members to talk about these as I feel I do not have sufficient knowledge to speak much about it.


And this my friends is Saint Lucia. On the 13th of december we celebrate the legend of saint Lucia, I will skip the legend itself since I should try to keep things short. When we celebrate saint Lucia, one girl is chosen to be Saint Lucia and wear a crown with candles, she along with the other girls dressed as maids and boys dressed as star boys, santas and ginger bread men will sing christmas songs and once the performances are over everyone will have a treat together. Often the treat is made up of Saffron buns, gingerbread, lemonade and coffe,  and sometimes even mulled wine. And by the way, mulled wine is pretty tasty and it comes both with and without alcohol.


Fruitcakes are more of a UK and southern european thing than a scandinavian tradition... Past few years the store chain Lidl have been selling Pandoro, Panettone and other breads similar to fruit cakes so they might be becoming more common now.


Here Olof sing about santa coming down the chimney and again, that is a brittish thing. In Scandinavia, Santa just come in through the door to meet everyone. Its lead to many jokes in shows about fathers having to go and buy a newspaper specifically at that time. Originally, before Santa existed we had the Yulegoat, yea it sounds bizarre but a person would dress up like a goat to give presents. The Yulegoat was sort of like a Krampus character, he was stern, but kind too. You can find the yulegoat in atleast one of Elsa Beskows books.


And this...uh... Its a tradition but its not really a christmas tradition... Sitting in a sauna is actually a finnish thing. So its often common during the winters that people sit in the saunas a while before they go to take a dip in the freezing water. I dont really get that, but to each his/her own.


Ok this one dont really have anything about a tradition that I havent really covered already, but I wanted to point out that there is a nut cracker there! And soldier nutcrackers are very much part of christmas thanks to the nutcracker musical. Also we love eating nuts at christmas^^


This one is a treat. While it isnt a tradition, the hat Anna wears is a Sami hat. Sami are like Scandinavias own native americans and they often care for reindeer. I cant say I know too much about the hat itself though. Also look behind her and you will see what looks like a late viking age armor. (I cant say for sure if it is though, Im not very knowledgeable about armors...)

And I think that is all traditions and symbols I could spot. There is so much more to know about the traditions  than I could say here but feel free to ask if there is anything you want to know about the scandinavian christmas traditions! :biggrin:
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 02:58:30 AM by Sakuya »
Sakuyamon.deviantart.com
In the mood for clawsome art?
Im always available for commissions!

Offline Scarlett

  • Trade Count: (+13)
  • Monster Hunter
  • ****
  • Posts: 1168
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2017, 02:03:21 PM »
Thanks for this - it's really interesting to read about the different traditions.  I'll feel very informed & be able ton"educate" and "entertain" my husband with these things when we see it - which won't be until after Christmas as Coco is released on 26 December here

Offline Knightfire

  • Trade Count: (+36)
  • Monsterista
  • *****
  • Posts: 3549
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
    • Growing Up is for Quitters
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2017, 04:54:32 PM »
Thank you so much for this! It adds so much more depth to see the little touches that are spread through the story.

Offline Listie

  • Trade Count: (+8)
  • Down Undah Diva
  • ****
  • Posts: 954
  • Gender: Female
  • Frankie Stein Fanatic!
    • View Profile
    • Tumblr
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2017, 12:04:03 AM »
Thanks for taking the time to post about the traditions seen in the story. I'm surprised that they actually included religious references, cause I don't remember any in a Disney feature since 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame'.

Oh dang, people are angry as heck about this short. At least now I know it's 20 minutes long. And apparently they're gonna drop it from the 8th of December? :( http://mashable.com/2017/12/02/coco-olaf-frozen-adventure-short-removed/#uLIpO_9lykqj Bummer, cause we don't get it until 26th of December, too.

Offline Sakuya

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • MIB Signature Jackson
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Gender: Female
  • Artist for hire!
    • View Profile
    • Sakuya's DA
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2017, 01:56:46 AM »
Well it is hard to do a christmas movie without anything religious in it, as they are all religious holidays, specially at the time frame that Elsa and Anna supposedly are in. But I think they feel they got something of a safe zone as they say its traditions and not beliefs or religon.

Personally I dont mind when movies include religous symbols and traditions, they can really enrich a movie even if they are just in the background. And it do not hurt to know about other religions, at the very least it might help you understand those people.
And I am very grateful for disney to have made the short to show some of Scandinavias traditions, you see them so very rarely in mainstream media that its always fun to see them featured.

Shame they are cutting of the short but I do understand that it might be the best solution. It would be much better for them to show it as a special on disney channel or something.
Oh and by the way, Listie you know you can find the short online now? It leaked yesterday, that was why I could get these screen grabs and talk about the traditions.

Sakuyamon.deviantart.com
In the mood for clawsome art?
Im always available for commissions!

Offline Quillette

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Beast Friends
  • ****
  • Posts: 558
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2017, 07:15:59 AM »
Then the people at the court ground mentions some traditions. "Rolling the lefsa" is what I think I heard someone of them say and I honestly dont know what that means... Either the english butchered the pronunciation or its something from one of the other holidays near xmas...

Lefse or ˈlefsə: a Norwegian flatbread, made from leftover mashed potatoes, butter, flour, and cream. It is rolled very thin and then very carefully (because it can tear easily) cooked on both sides on a spacial kind of large electric griddle that I cannot remember the name of. We just always called it the Lefse grill. We then spread butter and sprinkle sugar on it (and cinnamon if you are like my aunt), roll or fold it up, slice it, and eat it. My grandparents were from Norway, so this was a staple every Christmas Eve. Well most special occasions if I am honest, my family loves Lefse.

Side note, you can spread other things on it too, like jam or nutella, or sausage and eggs, but we always do the butter and sugar.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 07:47:30 AM by Quillette »

Offline Sakuya

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • MIB Signature Jackson
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Gender: Female
  • Artist for hire!
    • View Profile
    • Sakuya's DA
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2017, 11:18:55 AM »
Then the people at the court ground mentions some traditions. "Rolling the lefsa" is what I think I heard someone of them say and I honestly dont know what that means... Either the english butchered the pronunciation or its something from one of the other holidays near xmas...

Lefse or ˈlefsə: a Norwegian flatbread, made from leftover mashed potatoes, butter, flour, and cream. It is rolled very thin and then very carefully (because it can tear easily) cooked on both sides on a spacial kind of large electric griddle that I cannot remember the name of. We just always called it the Lefse grill. We then spread butter and sprinkle sugar on it (and cinnamon if you are like my aunt), roll or fold it up, slice it, and eat it. My grandparents were from Norway, so this was a staple every Christmas Eve. Well most special occasions if I am honest, my family loves Lefse.

Side note, you can spread other things on it too, like jam or nutella, or sausage and eggs, but we always do the butter and sugar.

That do sound very tasty^^
Sakuyamon.deviantart.com
In the mood for clawsome art?
Im always available for commissions!

Offline modernmonsterhigh

  • Trade Count: (+2)
  • MIB Signature Ghoulia
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
  • Squishy doll heads everywhere! :3
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2017, 06:14:58 PM »
Then the people at the court ground mentions some traditions. "Rolling the lefsa" is what I think I heard someone of them say and I honestly dont know what that means... Either the english butchered the pronunciation or its something from one of the other holidays near xmas...

Lefse or ˈlefsə: a Norwegian flatbread, made from leftover mashed potatoes, butter, flour, and cream. It is rolled very thin and then very carefully (because it can tear easily) cooked on both sides on a spacial kind of large electric griddle that I cannot remember the name of. We just always called it the Lefse grill. We then spread butter and sprinkle sugar on it (and cinnamon if you are like my aunt), roll or fold it up, slice it, and eat it. My grandparents were from Norway, so this was a staple every Christmas Eve. Well most special occasions if I am honest, my family loves Lefse.

Side note, you can spread other things on it too, like jam or nutella, or sausage and eggs, but we always do the butter and sugar.
Kind of sounds like sopapias yet you can have it sweet or savory
ISO Cupid and Holt’s rings.
Wishlist: http://mharena.com/index.php/topic,14628.0.html

Offline Jabroniville

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Voltageous
  • ***
  • Posts: 208
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2017, 12:37:30 PM »
Thank you for the notes! I was bummed about the negative reaction to the short, as it was quite beautiful and cute, but probably too long to stick in front of a good movie like Coco. I hope this doesn't hurt Frozen, and people come to appreciate the short for what it is.

Offline Sakuya

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • MIB Signature Jackson
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Gender: Female
  • Artist for hire!
    • View Profile
    • Sakuya's DA
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2017, 02:56:31 PM »
Thank you for the notes! I was bummed about the negative reaction to the short, as it was quite beautiful and cute, but probably too long to stick in front of a good movie like Coco. I hope this doesn't hurt Frozen, and people come to appreciate the short for what it is.

Yea it is a total shame.
But I heard that they are taking of the Frozen short and make it available in other ways, so that's good for everyone.
Sakuyamon.deviantart.com
In the mood for clawsome art?
Im always available for commissions!

Offline nessa16

  • Trade Count: (+14)
  • Voltageous
  • ****
  • Posts: 515
  • Gender: Female
  • Voltage!
    • View Profile
    • Nessa's Toybox
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2017, 02:58:27 PM »
Then the people at the court ground mentions some traditions. "Rolling the lefsa" is what I think I heard someone of them say and I honestly dont know what that means... Either the english butchered the pronunciation or its something from one of the other holidays near xmas...

Lefse or ˈlefsə: a Norwegian flatbread, made from leftover mashed potatoes, butter, flour, and cream. It is rolled very thin and then very carefully (because it can tear easily) cooked on both sides on a spacial kind of large electric griddle that I cannot remember the name of. We just always called it the Lefse grill. We then spread butter and sprinkle sugar on it (and cinnamon if you are like my aunt), roll or fold it up, slice it, and eat it. My grandparents were from Norway, so this was a staple every Christmas Eve. Well most special occasions if I am honest, my family loves Lefse.

Side note, you can spread other things on it too, like jam or nutella, or sausage and eggs, but we always do the butter and sugar.

Lefse is a big deal on the eastern end of ND.  I haven't learned to make it yet, but many of mine and my husband's family make it.  I used to get so bummed that I could never find it in CO when I lived there.  No one knew what it was.  My ex-husband's family thought it was weird when I brought it my last Christmas with them.  Only one of about 15-20 people would try it.  I tried to describe it to them with no avail.  I said that it's basically a potato tortilla. 

We always do butter and sugar also.  My brother will occasionally do peanut butter.  I never thought to do Nutella.  That would probably be really good. 

I was St Lucia for our class when I was in 2nd grade because I was the oldest girl in my class.  I was so excited because I felt like Kirsten Larson from the American Girl historical characters. 

It sucks that they are removing this short.  I have been wondering where I could see it.  I think that I would likely go to see Coco for this short, more than the actual movie.

Main Wishlist* Dolly Wishlist*LPS Wishlist*Doll Sales
"It's not about how hard you hit, but how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done!"-Sylvestor Stallone in Rocky Balboa. "Live long and prosper."

Offline Ameyal

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Sister Pack
  • *****
  • Posts: 3148
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2017, 08:57:08 PM »
They killed the short here in Mexico before I could watch it, so I went online :D
And then they just announced it for this friday on Disney Channel anyway...
It's real pretty, but yeah, it could easily be half as long and not lose any plot.

Offline Sakuya

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • MIB Signature Jackson
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Gender: Female
  • Artist for hire!
    • View Profile
    • Sakuya's DA
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2017, 05:53:23 AM »
What I find funny is that Elsa really is a "disney princess". She understood Sven immediately when he was trying to tell Kristoff that Olof were gone, she must be reaaaaally good with animals to understand all that!  :biggrin:
Sakuyamon.deviantart.com
In the mood for clawsome art?
Im always available for commissions!

Offline Jabroniville

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Voltageous
  • ***
  • Posts: 208
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2017, 02:12:28 AM »
Thank you for the notes! I was bummed about the negative reaction to the short, as it was quite beautiful and cute, but probably too long to stick in front of a good movie like Coco. I hope this doesn't hurt Frozen, and people come to appreciate the short for what it is.

Yea it is a total shame.
But I heard that they are taking of the Frozen short and make it available in other ways, so that's good for everyone.
Oh yeah, that's good. I'll get it on DVD or something, and be able to pause for all the pretty bits. CGI stuff is so hard to appreciate in the theatres, with all the stuff flying around.

Offline Fairy Tale Man

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Down Undah Diva
  • ****
  • Posts: 920
  • Gender: Male
  • Ever After High Fan
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2017, 12:35:09 PM »
They're showing it on TV this Sunday on ABC along with Frozen. xD

Offline Majesty

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Creative Kitty
  • ****
  • Posts: 674
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2017, 01:20:12 PM »
They're showing it on TV this Sunday on ABC along with Frozen. xD

I could be wrong but I thought it said a preview of the short but not the actual short.

Also, I wanted to clarify this isn't an actual movie right?  It's a short you get with the previews when going to see Coco?

At first I thought it was an actual movie that's why I wanted to clarify.

Nevermind it is on TV but it shows Thursday for me, unless the movie plays during Frozen which it could be.
I already have it on Bluray so I probably won't watch it on TV and just record the short and watch that.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 01:24:41 PM by Majesty »

Offline Sakuya

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • MIB Signature Jackson
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Gender: Female
  • Artist for hire!
    • View Profile
    • Sakuya's DA
Re: Olof's Frozen adventure and the traditions
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2017, 08:52:59 AM »
Guys! Tomorrow is Saint Lucia day! The day we celebrate the solstice and the returning light.
Ok, it dont fall on the same date as the solstice, but it's a bit complicated... It all started with the solstice celebrations of the vikings, just as with christmas the christian church put in the celebration of lucia at the same time so they intermingled and became a celebration of both Lucias divine goodness and the returning light. Later on when the calendars were adjusted they decided to pin Lucia to the 13th december instead of coinciding with the solstice, but that didnt stop us from keeping on with celebrating as the sign post of the returning light.

In the nordic countries, Lucia is a pretty important day not because we care much about an italian saint, but because of the promise of the light. It gets pretty dark here in the winter, sun dont rise until 9 in the morning and start setting at about 3 in the after noon, and we can get a lot of snow (not always but there is always a possibility) so that makes us love spring and summer and light so much more. Lucia reminds us in the darkest hours that we have the worst behind us and soon it will get brighter again.

I think I made enough of a wall of text for now, but feel free to ask me more about Saint Lucias day. Ill gladly tell you more about the traditions of Saint Lucia, the myth about Lucia and so on. If someone else celebrate Saint lucia outside of the nordic, I would love to hear how you celebrate it and what it means to you! :) :fireplace: 
Sakuyamon.deviantart.com
In the mood for clawsome art?
Im always available for commissions!